You don’t get more Australian than an Australian Cattle Dog. Often referred to as Red Heeler or Blue Heeler based on their colour, for those who have seen the movie Red Dog will know how beautiful and loyal these dogs are.

They’re an Australian icon, and this Australian Cattle Dog Breed Profile is here to fill you in on the history of the breed and whether they would suit you and your family as a pet.

Also known as

Australian Heeler; Blue Heeler; Red Heeler;

The Australian Stumpy Tale Cattle Dog can also be classified as an Australian Cattle Dog.

About the Australian Cattle Dog breed

Being iconic, the Australian Cattle Dog is one of the most popular dog’s in Australia. In the Outback you’ll find almost every dog owner has either a Blue Heeler or a Red Heeler. If they don’t, they’ll likely own the other popular working breed which is a Collie.

Australian Cattle Dogs somewhat represent a miniature German Shepherd, but their history lies with a number of ancestors. The breed evolved in the early to mid 20th century mostly from Collies and the Dingo, yet possibly with Kelpie and Dalmatian blood. You may be surprised at this last breed, but it is believed the Dalmation was the source of the speckles on Blue and Red Heelers.

As a staunch workhorse, Australian Cattle Dogs have proven to be excellent working dogs, originally used exclusively for cattle droving.

The latter half of the 20th century saw the Australian Cattle Dog gain popularity on the Australian dog show scene, and the general public began to take a keener interest. They have since become much loved family pets Australia-wide as well as being one of the most popular Australian working dogs.

Australian Cattle Dog temperament & lifestyle

With bounds of energy, dexterity, and keenness for both mental and physical stimulation, Australian Cattle Dogs make for excellent working dogs but also wonderfully loyal and enjoyable pets for active families. Owners of Blue and Red Heelers find the breed to remain active throughout their lifetime, and it’s likely two or three long walks a day will still leave your dog eager for more exercise.

If you put their energy levels aside, they’re a loyal, intelligent, loving, and non-aggressive dog who integrate well with people, children, and often other dogs.

Are Australian Cattle Dogs easy to train?

Yes, as one of the most intelligent and eager to learn breeds of dog you will find the Australian Cattle Dog to learn fast and learn well. They do however become very excitable when they’re young, so chose your training schedule wisely for optimum results.

Feeding & dietary requirements

As working dogs it would seem to make sense to feed one of the many Australian Working Dog brands of dog food. Although these offer a cheap feed, the reality is they are the opposite of what a highly active breed needs. The assumption with working dog foods is the dog will burn off a great deal of carbohydrates without suffering the negative consequences, and as such are made mostly from cereal and cereal by-products which are harsh on digestion and lead to all manner of illnesses in later years.

A more optimum diet for an Australian Cattle Dog is one rich in meat proteins, organs, and meaty bones, combined in part with foods which mimic the gut contents of prey.

For country folk it is often easy and relatively cheap to source whole prey ingredients, and for those in the cities we have a wide variety of commercial products including air-dried, freeze-dried, raw BARF patties, or even mail order dog dinners. These come at a price, and your energetic Heeler will chow through a fair amount, so feel free to mix with whatever quality meat products you can buy from the supermarket or local butcher.

Vital statistics

Height 20 in., bitches 19 in. 

Weight 15.5kg (35 lb.), bitches 14.5kg (32 lb.) 

Colour blue-speckled or red-speckled (these flecks show the Dalmatian blood, as do the black head patches). 

Coat short, head long and harsh, weather-resisting. Fairly narrow; ears set high and erect; back short ; legs fairly long with compact feet; tail long and carried low, although horizontal when the dog is excited.

Buying an Australian Cattle Dog puppy

How much do Australian Cattle Dog puppies cost?

You can pay as low as $300 for a Blue Heeler or Red Heeler in Australia. A top breeder may sell Blue Heelers for upwards of $1000, and the popularity of the movie Red Dog has led to an increase in price for Red Heelers which can be as much as $3000.

Where can I buy an Australian Cattle Dog puppy near me?

The best starting point for finding an Australian Cattle Dog puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

How can I tell a good breeder?

A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

Further information

If you have any further information on the Australian Cattle Dog dog then please comment below and we will add it to the Australian Cattle Dog breed profile. Thank you.

The Appenzell Mountain Dog, also commonly known as Appenzell Sennenhund, hails from the mountains of Switzerland. It’s a vastly different landscape to Australia and as such you may find this breed hard to come by Down Under.

But if you do, or if you get the chance to bring one of these beautiful dogs into your family, then our Appenzell Mountain Dog breed profile has all the information you could possibly need!

Also known as

Appenzell Sennenhund

About the Appenzell Mountain Dog breed

Of the Swiss Mountain Dogs the Appenzell, named after the Canton of Appenzell, the Appenzell Mountain Dog is the second favourite and third in the scale of size when it comes to these breeds.

The Appenzell comes runner-up to the Bernese in popularity in Switzerland and has become somewhat fashionable in Great Britain and the U.S.A as well. They also happen to be the most rare of the Swiss Sennenhund dog breeds.

Appenzell Mountain Dogs first became international when Mr. Mark Welch first introduced them to England in 1936, having imported a brace from the Appenzell Canton.

A specialist club in Great Britain for the breed was brought into existence as early as 1906, and the club played a key part in boosting the popularity of the breed in subsequent years, particularly amongst breeders and farmers.

The Appenzell Mountain Dog is mostly used as a Herder’s or Drover’s dog, but many have sprung up in towns and cities as they make excellent pets.

Also see Swiss Mountain Dog.

Appenzell Mountain Dog temperament & lifestyle

They’re a cheerful breed and work well in a family setting. The breed is rarely afraid of anything which promotes a confidence and self-assurance.

Appenzeller’s are a medium breed with a moderate activity level which makes them an enjoyable dog to own.

Are Appenzell Mountain Dogs easy to train?

As a relatively shy breed the Appenzell Mountain Dog benefits greatly with early socialisation with other dogs and people. They are smart and versatile and respond well to training, but their sensitivity and wariness of strangers means they have a tendency to bark. This is fine if you want a watchdog, but would otherwise be something you with to address in the puppy phase. 

Feeding & dietary requirements

All dogs need a high quality diet rich in meat and other “whole prey” ingredients, and the Appenzell Mountain Dog is no different. In terms of kibble they will not require as much as a breed such as the Labrador, but may still cost you a fair amount on premium foods. As with any dog they will respond well to fresh, raw, and raw meaty bone diets as well.

Vital statistics

Weight 14.5kg to 16kg (32-35 lb).

Height 19-23 in.

Colour: a tricolour of jet black, deep russet brown and clean white. 

Coat short and dense, flat and shiny.

Ears triangular and folded over; body cobby;

Tail curled tight over the back. 

Buying an Appenzell Mountain Dog puppy

How much do Appenzell Mountain Dog puppies cost?

Appenzell Mountain Dog puppies are up there with some of the most expensive breeds, so expect to pay a minimum of $3000.

Where can I buy an Appenzell Mountain Dog puppy near me?

The best starting point for finding an Appenzell Mountain Dog puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

How can I tell a good breeder?

A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

Further information

If you have any further information on the Appenzell Mountain Dog dog then please comment below and we will add it to the Appenzell Mountain Dog breed profile. Thank you.

Are you thinking of getting an Afghan Hound puppy? If so our Afghan Hound breed profile is the perfect starting point to see if this is the right breed for you.

Also known as

Balkh Greyhound; Baluchi Hound; Barukhzy Hound

About the Afghan Hound breed

One of the largest of the Greyhound family and a native of Afghanistan where rock carvings from 2200 B.C. portray the Afghan Hound in exactly the same form as it is now.

In Afghanistan the breed is utilised for hunting purposes by the Shirakees and for guard-work by the authorities. The Afghan Hounds was later introduced into England by Captain John Barff; who’s dog “Zardin” was, in 1907, the first of the breed to be entered into a show. “Zardin” later became the ideal model for the breed. 

Afghan Hound temperament & lifestyle

Afghan Hounds are friendly and sociable in nature which makes them great family pets. Even during the puppy stage they respond well to interaction with children, although care must be taken as they do not respond well to rough play.

The breed is intelligent and independent, but also tend to be very loyal.

Are Afghan Hounds easy to train?

Afghan Hounds are intelligent but stubborn, so ensure you train them with gentle guidance and firm commands. Any abruptness and bossy commands on your part will likely result in a refusal to obey, frustration on your part, and prove very non-productive.

Feeding & dietary requirements

Afghan Hounds have no specific dietary requirements and are rarely prone to allergies or intolerances. Like all dogs, Afghan Hounds need a diet rich in meat protein and other “whole prey” ingredients.

If raw is not for you then at least opt for a more premium diet such as air or freeze dried, BARF, or a high end small breed kibble.

Vital statistics

Height 27-29 in., bitches 24-26 in.

Weight 27 to 30 kilos (60-66 lb). 

Any colour is permissible, but red, cream, fawn or golden are common. 

Coat fine, short along the back, very long on ears, limbs, feet and hindquarters.

Profuse trousers and a silky topknot constitute the dog’s main peculiarities. 

Feet large; tail ringed and carried gaily when in action.

Buying an Afghan Hound puppy

How much do Afghan Hound puppies cost?

If you’re looking to buy an Afghan Hound puppy then thankfully they are one of the most cost-effective breeds to buy. You may find a decent Afghan Hound for as little as $300 in Australia, although prices do vary and expect to pay an average of $1000 to $2000, or $2500 at a push.

Where can I buy an Afghan Hound puppy near me?

The best starting point for finding an Afghan Hound puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

How can I tell a good breeder?

A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

Further information

If you have any further information on the Afghan Hound dog then please comment below and we will add it to the Afghan Hound breed profile. Thank you.

The Akita breed of dog is loyal, strong-willed, and somewhat fashionable making it one of the most expensive breeds to buy in Australia.

Whether you want more information on Akita dogs or looking to adopt an Akita puppy, then our Akita breed profile is the perfect starting point!

Also known as

Akita is the most common name for the breed, but they are also commonly known worldwide as the Japanese Deerhound, and lesser known as the Nippon Inu.

About the Akita breed

The Akita is the medium-sized and standard variety of the Japanese Inu. This ancient breed was at one time threatened with extinction, but revived by Mr. Hiroshi Saito, who pioneered the breed in nations outside of Japan.

In June, 1928, the Nippon Inu Hozonkai (Society for the Preservation of Japanese Dogs) was formed to popularise this artistic breed of dog.

In Japan, the Akita breed has been used mostly for boar and deer-hunting. It is less well known in other countries, although a brace were imported into England from Japan in 1937 from which an English foundation stock was bred.

The Akita is a typical Spitz, with broad-pointed skull, stiff fur on the back but softer hair elsewhere, and a curled, gay and bushy tail.

Akita temperament & lifestyle

In most cases the Akita will be a very loyal and affectionate family member, but as an independent dog they prefer to have full attention and tend not to get along with other family pets.

They are loyal but also protective of their home and family, so be wary of other dogs approaching their territory. Akitas range in size which makes some of the larger sizes of the breed can be difficult to control for some.

They are a beautiful breed and can make very good pets when thoroughly stimulated, trained, and integrated, but make sure they are the breed for you as these dogs are not for everyone.

Are Akita easy to train?

Akita’s thrive on mental stimulation. They’re a highly intelligent breed and known to get bored and unsettled easily, so training them and involving them in your daily routine and chores will offer them stimulation, happiness, and eagerness to learn. Due to their intelligence and astuteness they are easier to train than average.

Feeding & dietary requirements

All dogs need a high quality diet rich in meat and other “whole prey” ingredients, and the Akita breed is no different.

If raw is not for you then at least opt for a more premium diet such as air or freeze dried, BARF, or a high end small breed kibble.

Vital statistics

Height 20-23 1/2 in., bitches 18 3/4-21 1/4 in. 

Colours: white (except Army Dogs), fawn, wheaten, black, grey, brindle, and black-and-tan.

Buying an Akita puppy

How much do Akita puppies cost?

Akita puppies have become somewhat fashionable in Australia and as such have become one of the most expensive dog breeds. Although it’s possible to buy an Akita puppy for as little as $1500, most sell around the $4500 mark from a reputable breeder.

Where can I buy an Akita puppy near me?

The Akita breed is not overly common so expect to travel to find a suitable and trusted breeder.

The best starting point for finding an Akita puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

How can I tell a good breeder?

A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

Further information

If you have any further information on the Akita dog then please comment below and we will add it to the Akita breed profile. Thank you.

Are you thinking of getting an Airedale Terrier puppy? If so our Airedale Terrier breed profile is the perfect starting point to see if this is the right breed for you.

Also known as

The Airedale Terrier is also known by the following names – Bingley Terrier; Waterside Terrier; Wharfedale Terrier

About the Airedale Terrier breed

The Airedale Terrier is the largest of the Terrier family, taking its name from the valley of the Aire in Yorkshire, England. The breed was created in the middle of the 19th century from the Otterhound and a black-and-tan wire-haired sporting Terrier.

With great success, the Airedale Terrier was used as an Army Dog in both World Wars, and subsequently became in great demand as a guard dog for the railway and docks police in the mid 20th century in both Britain and the U.S.A.

Airedale Terrier temperament & lifestyle

This breed is surprisingly loyal and an easy dog to own, particularly if trained correctly from the puppy phase. Airedale Terriers make a good family dog due to their keenness to being around people, and are often unproblematic with children.

Airedale Terriers have been used often as police dogs and guard dogs due to their reliability, with an inane ability to hunt vermin and game.

Are Airedale Terriers easy to train?

Airedale Terriers react well to training and can easily become solid, reliable family pets. It is best to train them from an early age.

Feeding & dietary requirements

Airedale Terriers are one of the largest of the Terrier group of dogs and their dietary intake can be considered that of a medium breed of dog.

All dogs need a high quality diet rich in meat and other “whole prey” ingredients, but if raw is not for you then at least opt for a more premium diet such as air or freeze dried, BARF, or a high end small breed kibble.

Vital statistics

Airedale Terriers are around 23 to 24 inches in height and 20kg to 23kg in weight.

Colour tan or grizzle with a jet black saddle or waistcoat. Coat harsh and wiry, neat and smart. Head fairly long with flat skull; ears small and V-shaped; back short and level; legs heavily boned and straight, with compact feet; tail docked, set high and carried gaily.

Buying an Airedale Terrier puppy

How much do Airedale Terrier puppies cost?

Airedale Terrier puppies are up there with some of the most expensive breeds, so expect to pay a minimum of $3000.

Where can I buy an Airedale Terrier puppy near me?

The best starting point for finding an Airedale Terrier puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

How can I tell a good breeder?

A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

Further information

If you have any further information on the Airedale Terrier dog then please comment below and we will add it to the Airedale Terrier breed profile. Thank you.

Are you thinking of getting a Australian Terrier puppy? If so our Australian Terrier breed profile is the perfect starting point to see if this is the right breed for you.

About the Australian Terrier breed

A fairly popular dog in Australia and New Zealand is the Australian Terrier, which is a low-set dog obviously showing its descent from the Yorkshire, Norwich, Cairn and other British Terriers, which together made this comparatively recent breed.

Although the breed has had many devotees in the Antipodes and has been exhibited there since about 1888, it is still not bred as meticulously as it might be.

In fact, many of the British-bred stock are finer in type. Sydney Silky dogs are frequently crossed with Australians, which is not to the advantage of either.

The Australian Terrier breed was introduced to Great Britain shortly over a century ago, and thanks to the pioneering work of the Countess of Stradbroke and Mrs. Bassett, it became a well known breed during that era.

Australian Terrier temperament & lifestyle

Australian Terriers have high energy and need plenty of exercise. But their compact size and low-shedding, low-maintenance coat make them a good choice for active apartment dwellers. If you’re looking for a watchdog, this breed’s loyalty and tendency to alert their humans when something is out of the ordinary may be just what you’re looking for. Meet the breed’s needs and you’ll have a loving and dedicated little best friend for life.

Like a true Aussie, these dogs have gusto and attitude. They’re mischievous, smart, and full of energy. In fact, you might be surprised how much energy they have, and they definitely need exercise, although apartment living is still possible as long as you are able to take them out once or twice a day.

Are Australian Terriers easy to train?

Australian Terriers are very astute having a heightened sense of hearing and smell, and accordingly make a good watchdog. They’re smart and easy to train, but their alertness makes them prone to barking at far off noises which is sometimes a hard trait to train out of them.

Feeding & dietary requirements

Being a small dog means feeding an Australian Terrier a high quality diet is more plausible. Like with any dog it is best to focus on a diet rich in meat and other “whole prey” ingredients, but if raw is not for you then at least opt for a more premium diet such as air or freeze dried, BARF, or a high end small breed kibble.

Vital statistics

Australian Terriers are around 10 inches in height and 4.5kg to 5kg in ideal weight. Their coats can be blue in colour, with rich tan legs and face, or sandy-red.

Australian Terriers have a medium coat, straight and hard. Ears pricked or dropped forward, tail docked short.

Buying an Australian Terrier puppy

How much do Australian Terrier puppies cost?

Australian Terrier puppies are up there with some of the most expensive breeds, so expect to pay a minimum of $3000.

Where can I buy an Australian Terrier puppy near me?

The best starting point for finding an Australian Terrier puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

How can I tell a good breeder?

A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

Further information

If you have any further information on the Australian Terrier dog then please comment below and we will add it to the Australian Terrier breed profile. Thank you.

If you’re interested in a specific dog breed, their history, temperament, trainability, feeding & dietary requirements, and vital stats, then this list of dog breed profiles is for you. I’ve put together the most thorough information I can, not just on popular breeds, but lesser known breeds as well.

I have included a glossary of technical terms in dogs & dog breeding further down for reference.

Enough introduction (I’ll save that for later), so onwards with my list of dog breed profiles:

List of dog breed profiles / information

List of dog breeds by Type / Group

All dogs are classified by type, known as a group. Below are a list of all dog breeds by group:

Group 1 – Toy Breeds

    Group 2 – Terrier Breeds

    Group 3 – Gundogs

      Group 4 – Hounds

      Group 5 – Working Dogs

      Group 6 – Utility

      Group 7 – Non Sporting

        Why I have collated these dog breed profiles

        There is a large and growing public interested in the canine world and it is felt that this list of dog breed profiles would be welcomed as a thorough account of the dog family.

        Websites already exist which deal with the more popular breeds, but many interesting breeds and varieties, which are described in this collection, have been neglected owing to their not having, so far, reached the exhibition benches, and their origin, history, habits and descriptions are practically unknown to any but the specialist.

        I have included about 3oo breeds and varieties in this collection of dog breed profiles. Those selected being worthy of attention for their usefulness, appearance and habits.

        With the assistance of photographic illustrations I hope this collection of dog breeds will be of interest to every dog owner, and also to many others who have never had the good fortune to possess a dog companion.

        It is my hope that many of the descriptions will help to make some of the very deserving but lesser-known breeds and varieties more popular.

        The terms “breed ” and “variety”, although loosely applied outside the study of dogs have their special significances, thus we speak in cynological circles of the Fox Terrier breed and its Smooth-haired and Wire-haired varieties.

        In cases where a breed is known under various names (Synonymy) I have given the alternatives under the section “Also known as”.

        There is no satisfactory classification of breeds into groups at present, and I have therefore arranged the breeds in alphabetical order, dividing into sections, with a view towards uniformity.

        The measurements in the “Vital stats” section are mainly based upon standard descriptions, but in some cases adjustments are made to conform to more general sizes.

        Wild dogs (genuinely and so-called) are treated relative to their importance, and represent

        perhaps not the least interesting of the dog tribe.

        In order to condense my descriptions, I have employed some technical terms in common use. A glossary explaining such terms in dogs & dog breeding can be found below.

        Glossary of technical terms in dogs & dog breeding

        Beard. The very profuse and bushy whiskers of the Griffon Bruxellois, quite distinct from Terrier whiskers.

        Belton. The lemon- or blue-flecked colour of certain English Setters, notably the Laverack strain.

        Blaze. An attractive narrow and bulbous-shaped white marking running up the face to between the eyes.

        Bone. A well-boned dog is one possessing limbs giving an appearance and feel of strength and spring without coarseness.

        Brindle. A mixture of light and dark hairs, usually darker streaks on a grey, tawny or brown background.

        Brush. Term applied to a tail bushy like that of the fox either curled like the Spitz group or low like the Collie.

        Cat-feet. Short, compact and round feet common to Terriers and Greyhounds, and opposed to splay-feet.

        Chops. Pendulous upper lips or flews common to the Bulldog, some Hounds and most deep-mouthed dogs.

        Cobby. Well ribbed and sprung, rather short in back, adequately muscled and compact.

        Couplings. The torso or trunk between the limb-joints; Dachshunden are ” long in couplings.”

        Cropped. In some breeds the ears are cropped or cut to erect shapes. It is illegal in Britain and some American States.

        Croup. The region adjacent to the sacrum and immediately anterior to the set-on or root of the tail.

        Culotte. The feathery hair on the backs of the fore-legs, as seen on the Pomeranian.

        Cushion. That appearance of swelling or padding given by the full upper lips of the Mastiff and Bulldog. 

        Dew-claws. The fifth digit and claw occasionally found on the legs of mountain breeds, and usually removed when young.

        Dish-faced. A term used to describe a concavity in the nasal bone making the nose-tip too high and snub.

        Docked. Most Terriers have their tails docked or cut short to especially designed lengths when quite young.

        Down-faced. When the nose-tip is well below the level of the stop, due to a downward inclination of the nasal bone.

        Drop-eared. When the ears are pendant and hanging close and flat to the side of the cheeks.

        Featherings. Those long and fine fringes of hair seen on the backs of all legs in Setters, Spaniels and some Sheep dogs.

        Flag. The fringe or feather found under the tails of Setters and some Retrievers, long at the base and shorter at the tip.

        Flecked. When the coat is lightly ticked with other colours, as in the English Setter, and neither roaned nor spotted.

        Fly-eared. Usually a blemish, in that ears which should be erect fall or tilt over at the tips.

        Forelock. The very abundant tussle of hair grown on the forehead and falling over the eyes, as in the Kerry Blue.

        Frill. That long feathering of soft hair found on Setters and Collies around the neck and longer at the throat and base.

        Fringes. A loosely applied term usually meaning the feathering of long-coated breeds. See Featherings.

        Gay. A tail is said to be gay when it is curled up over the back as in all the Spitz group, or erect as in some Hounds.

        Hare-feet. Such feet as have the digits well separated, usually being long, like a hare’s.

        Haw. The inner part of the lower eyelid which shows red and hangs open in such breeds as the St. Bernard and Bloodhound.

        Hocks. Those joints in the hind limbs below the true knees, or stifle-joints.

        Hound-marked. Fox Terriers are described as Hound-marked when their body patches conform to the pattern of Hound markings.

        Leather. The skin of the ear which is often trimmed. The term has particular reference to ears which are pendant and large.

        Mask. The muzzle or fore-face, generally so-called with reference to colour; for example, a light Cairn may have a dark mask.

        Merle. A blue-grey mixture streaked or ticked with black, and usually seen in some Collies and Shetland Sheepdogs.

        Over-shot. When the upper teeth project beyond the lower. A blemish in most breeds, though the lesser of jaw malformations.

        Particolour. A term used for Pekingese of two colours in equal proportions, usually red-and-white and black-and-white.

        Peak. The pronounced and pointed top of the occiput which is, in the Bloodhound and allied breeds, a favourable point.

        Pencillings. The dark and elegant lines on the surface of the toes in some breeds, notably the Black-and-Tan Miniature Terrier.

        Pied. When two colours occur in irregular patches, one more than the other, a dog is said to be pied.

        Plumes. Whereas the brush is not always soft, plumes refer to the soft hair on the tail of the Pekingese and Pomeranian.

        Prick-eared. When the ears are erect, as in Chow Chows, Schipperkes, Alsatians and Welsh Corgis.

        Quarterings. The term, not often used, to denote good or bad limb junctions, particularly the hind-quarters.

        Roached. A dog’s back is roached when it arches convexly, as in the Dandie Dinmont, Italian Greyhound and Whippet.

        Rose-eared. When the ear, neither pricked nor dropped, folds or twists over, showing the inside, as in the Bulldog.

        Ruff. The stand-off frill or apron of long (usually coarse) hair around the neck, as in the Chow Chow.

        Saddle. The black rectangular marking on the back extending to the upper flanks, as in the Airedale and Welsh Terriers.

        Self-marked. A dog is so-called when it is a whole colour, with white or pale markings on the chest, feet and tail tip.

        Splay-feet. Feet of which the toes are spread out, as in some sporting breeds used in water-fowling.

        Stern. A term frequently employed for the tail, with particular reference to Foxhounds, Harriers and Beagles.

        Stife. That joint in the hind leg of a dog most approximating to the knee in man, particularly relating to the inner side.

        Stop. The depression between and in front of the eyes roughly corresponding to the bridge of the nose; deep in Pugs.

        Tongue. To “give tongue” is for a Hound to voice when on the scent. To “sing” being a moderate tongue, and “babble” an excess.

        Topknot. The longer, finer hair on the top of the head rather like a powder-puff, as in Dandie

        Dinmonts.

        Tricolour. A term used when dogs have three colours more or less proportionate, usually black, tan and white, as in Hounds.

        Trousers. The hair on the hindquarters. The term is often used in reference to Afghan Hounds and Poodles.

        Tucked-up. When the loins are lifted up yet the chest is deep, giving a racy appearance, as in Borzo, Greyhounds and Whippets.

        Undercoat. That soft furry wool beneath the outer hair of some breeds, often of different colour to the latter.

        Under-shot. When the lower jaw and teeth project beyond the upper, as in the Bulldog and allied races.

        Wall eyes. Eyes particoloured white-and-blue, seen in merle-coloured Collies and Sheep-dogs, often keenly valued.

        Whiskers. The beard of Fox Terriers and allied Terriers, generally elongated and tidy, rather than bushy and too profuse.Wrinkle. The loose folds of skin puckered up on the brow and sides of the face in Bloodhounds, St. Bernards and Basenjis.

        Are you thinking of getting a German Shepherd puppy? If so our German Shephard Dog breed profile is the perfect starting point to see if this is the right breed for you.

        About the German Shepherd Breed

        The German Shepherd dog is one of the oldest of the known breeds of dogs, dating back 6,000 years to the Early Bronze Age. Much of the half-wolf fallacy was exploded by the researches of the late Max von Stephanitz, but even so the German Shephard was for a long time the most hated as well as the best loved breed.

        German Shepherd Temperament & Trainability

        The German Shepherd shows undoubted tracking abilities and unquestionable intelligence, so it comes as no surprise the breed is universally accepted as a Police Dog, Army Dog and Guide Dog for the Blind.

        Feeding & Dietary Requirements

        German Shepherd puppies grow rapidly, and accordingly need a diet rich in meat and meat proteins and fat to ensure correct growth and mitigate the risk of conditions such as hip-displasia.

        Even in their older years, their strong muscular frame demands a significant amount of meat in the diet. Any German Shepherd fed a diet high in carbohydrates from grains or starches will likely show signs of fatigue, uneasy joint movement, and have a coat which lacks shine.

        Also known as

        The German Shepherd Dog is also known as Alsatian or Schäferhund. They are commonly abbreviated to GSD.

        The strictly correct name for the breed is German Shepherd Dog rather than the originally popular name Alsatian.

        Vital Stats

        SizeHeight about 25 in., bitches 23 in.
        ColoursSable, wolf-grey, brindle, black and black-and-tan are the most popular shades. Rarer colours are white, part-white, and cream.
        CoatMedium length, smooth and not tightly curled. Tail fringed and set-on low.

        Buying a German Shephard Dog puppy

        How much do German Shepherd puppies cost?

        The cost of German Shepherd puppies has increased in recent years, with $750 to $1200+ being average depending on the quality of the pup.

        Where can I buy a German Shepherd puppy near me?

        The best starting point for finding a German Shepherd puppy in Australia is to search the Australian Association of Pet Dog Breeders (AAPDB) Member List. Full members have had their premises audited by a registered veterinarian for compliance against the AAPDB Code of Ethics, which means they meet animal welfare standards.

        Individual states have their own organisations in which breeders can become members.

        Dog breeder organisations by Australian state:

        How can I tell a good breeder?

        A good breeder will be listed by one of the above organisations, but there are many ways to tell if they’re responsible or not.

        Social media recommendations from other local dog owners can help point you in the right direction, but always take due diligence when buying a puppy.

        A good breeder will always be happy to answer questions, allow for multiple viewings, and should not be pushy in any way. When picking up the puppy they should be willing for you to go to their premises, not ask to meet in a park or public place.

        Good breeders will be proactive in asking you questions to ensure you will be a responsible dog owner, and will supply you with an information pack. Many will ask you to sign a contract to ensure the puppy is taken care of, or if they find out this is not the case they will have a legal right to reclaim the puppy.

        Further information

        If you have any further information on the German Shepherd Dog breed then please comment below and we will add it to this page. Thank you.

        It won’t be news to most of you that commercial, heavily processed pet food or unbalanced home-made meals may lack the nutrients your pet needs to truly thrive. But did you know that there is a easy way to balance out the nutrition in the diet you’re already serving your dog or cat?

        Why should I feed my dog multi vitamins?

        Like taking a Multi-Vitamin, a decent supplement for dogs can help improve general wellbeing. No matter what your pet’s current diet, even kibble, one of these supplements is well worth adding to your dog’s diet!

        If you can opt for a multi vitamin supplement which uses human-grade or natural ingredients. I’ll recommend a decent one below, but you may find a savvy local pet business who create their own.

        Key benefits of a doggy multi vitamin supplements

        Here are a few key benefits of giving your dog a multi vitamin supplement alongside his or her regular food:

        • Provides essential nutrients that cooking or processing foods can destroy
        • Promotes healthy skin and shiny coat
        • Promotes a healthy immune system
        • Naturally enhances energy & vitality
        • Promotes healthy organ and gut function
        • Prevention & management of arthritis and joint pain

        There’s a few on the market, but the one I favour the most is Bruce Syme’s Vets All Natural Health Booster available from My Pet Warehouse. It’s Australian made with loads of multivitamins and ingredients to boost health. It’s designed to be fed alongside a diet, and what I do is sprinkle a little on top of my dog’s evening meal.

        Here’s a video which covers the range of Vets All Natural products of which there are a many. They make a great meal mix which you mix with fresh meat, and Bruce is also the guy behind Balanced Life.

        How much and how often?

        Most supplements are designed to be fed daily, but don’t overthink it. A varied diet is always a good idea so adding in a little here and there will always have benefit. If you’re on a budget then just add some to your dog’s meal as and when you can – most supplements tend to have a decent shelf life.